Help Guide Article on Suicide

Help Guide Article on Suicide

Warning signs of suicide.

Take any suicidal talk or behavior seriously. It’s not just a warning sign that the person is thinking about suicide—it’s a cry for help.

Most suicidal individuals give warning signs or signals of their intentions. The best way to prevent suicide is to recognize these warning signs and know how to respond if you spot them. If you believe that a friend or family member is suicidal, you can play a role in suicide prevention by pointing out the alternatives, showing that you care, and getting a doctor or psychologist involved. Major warning signs for suicide include talking about killing or harming oneself, talking or writing a lot about death or dying, and seeking out things that could be used in a suicide attempt, such as weapons and drugs. These signals are even more dangerous if the person has a mood disorder such as depression or bipolar disorder, suffers from alcohol dependence, has previously attempted suicide, or has a family history of suicide. A more subtle but equally dangerous warning sign of suicide is hopelessness. Studies have found that hopelessness is a strong predictor of suicide. People who feel hopeless may talk about “unbearable” feelings, predict a bleak future, and state that they have nothing to look forward to. Other warning signs that point to a suicidal mind frame include dramatic mood swings or sudden personality changes, such as switching from outgoing to withdrawn or well-behaved to rebellious. A suicidal person may also lose interest in day-to-day activities, neglect his or her appearance, and show big changes in eating or sleeping habits.

Suicide warning signs include:

Talking about suicide – Any talk about suicide, dying, or self-harm, such as “I wish I hadn’t been born,” “If I see you again…” and “I’d be better off dead.” Seeking out lethal means – Seeking access to guns, pills, knives, or other objects that could be used in a suicide attempt. Preoccupation with death – Unusual focus on death, dying, or violence. Writing poems or stories about death. No hope for the future – Feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and being trapped (“There’s no way out”). Belief that things will never get better or change. Self-loathing, self-hatred – Feelings of worthlessness, guilt, shame, and self-hatred. Feeling like a burden (“Everyone would be better off without me”). Getting affairs in order – Making out a will. Giving away prized possessions. Making arrangements for family members. Saying goodbye – Unusual or unexpected visits or calls to family and friends. Saying goodbye to people as if they won’t be seen again. Withdrawing from others – Withdrawing from friends and family. Increasing social isolation. Desire to be left alone. Self-destructive behavior – Increased alcohol or drug use, reckless driving, unsafe sex. Taking unnecessary risks as if they have a “death wish.” Sudden sense of calm – A sudden sense of calm and happiness after being extremely depressed can mean that the person has made a decision to attempt suicide.

“Grief, no matter where it comes from, can only be resolved by connecting to other people.” — Thomas Horn, Actor.   

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Great Books on Death and Grief

Here are some insightful reads to help you through your loss.

1. On grief and grieving by David Kessler and Elisabeth Kubler-Ross
2. Home with God by Neal Donald Walsch
3. A Grief Observed by C.S. Lewis
4. The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpoche
5. The Bright Hour: a memoir of living and dying by Nina Riggs
6. With the End in Mind: Dying, Death and Wisdom in an Age of Denial by Kathryn Mannix
7. Good Grief: Heal your Soul, Honor your Loved Ones and Learn to Live Again by Theresa Caputo & Kristina Grish

Personally, I find reading to be very therapeutic and healing.

Music Heals

Music Heals

 

Music has a way of healing physical, mental, emotional and spiritual pain. Ever notice how a song can put you in a good mood or sad mood just by listening to the lyrics or the melody. It’s my go to remedy when I’ve had a bad day or if I need a mood boost or if I need inspiration. Music is the language of the soul and has the ability to heal and transcend. Here is a list of songs to help you grieve with ease. Or you can create your own play list.

 

Questions about Death

Questions about Death

 

  • Do ghosts and spirits of our deceased loved ones exist, or are they only mental projections?
  • How can we be sure there is or is not life after death?
  • If death is inevitable, why bother doing anything?
  • Is there such a thing as a good death?
  • How can we know for sure that there is an afterlife?
  • How do you properly say goodbye to someone that has died?